Raspberry extract shows strong anti-ageing potential

By Andrew MCDOUGALL

- Last updated on GMT

Raspberry extract shows strong anti-ageing potential

Related tags Skin

Research carried out by two biotechnology companies has found that an extract from the raspberry plant is effective in promoting skin hydration and protecting the cells from excessive water loss, meaning it could have potential for skin care and anti-ageing applications.

Having carried out studies on the Rubus idaeus liposoluble extract, published in the International Journal of Cosmetic Science​, researchers from Italian firms VitaLab and Arterra Bioscience found that it can be used as a hydrating and moisturising ingredient in face and body lotions, and as anti-ageing product in face creams specifically designed to fight wrinkle formation.

Raspberry plants, belonging to the species of Rubus idaeus, are known for their excellent therapeutic properties as they are particularly rich in compounds with strong antioxidant activity, which promote health and well-being of human cells.

Besides their high content of phenolic compounds, Rubus plants are rich in oil-soluble compounds, which are also primary components of the hydrolipidic film barrier of the skin.

As plant cell cultures represent a valuable system to produce interesting compounds and ingredients for cosmetic applications, the research team decided to develop liquid suspension cultures from Rubus idaeus leaves and use them to obtain an active ingredient aimed at improving hydration and moisturisation capacity in the skin.

Lab work

In this work, Rubus idaeus cells were grown in the laboratory under sterile and controlled conditions as liquid suspension cultures, and were processed to obtain an oil-soluble extract, containing phenolic compounds and a wide range of fatty acids.

The extract was tested on cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts and then on the skin in vivo, to assess its cosmetic activities.

The researchers found that when tested on skin cell cultures, the extract induced the genes responsible for skin hydration, such as aquaporin 3, filaggrin, involucrin and hyaluronic acid synthase, and stimulated the expression and the activity of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, involved in ceramide production.

“Moreover, the liposoluble extract increased the synthesis of the extracellular matrix components in cultured fibroblasts and showed a remarkable skin-hydrating capacity when tested on human skin in vivo,”​ says the research.

Related topics Formulation & Science Skin Care

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