Study suggests cosmetic preservative adds to aging process

By Simon Pitman

- Last updated on GMT

A new study finds that a common additive found in cosmetics has
been found to inhibit the activity of sirtuins, enzymes associated
with lifespan control in yeast and other organisms, a discovery
that could question its future use.

The study, which was carried out by a research team that the University of California, Berkeley, and is published today in the online journal Public Library of Science (PLoS) Genetics​, found that in lab tests, dihydrocoumarin (DHC), a compound found naturally in sweet clover and synthetically manufactured for use in foods and cosmetics, inhibited the activity of Sir2p and SIRT1, forms of sirtuin found in yeast and humans, respectively.

Increased sirtuin activity is known to increase longevity in yeast, roundworms and fruit flies. The opposite effect in yeast has also been shown when the sirtuin enzyme is either deleted or reduced - the lifespan decreases by as much as 30 per cent.

"Although studies on sirtuins and longevity have not been done in humans, there is reason to suspect that sirtuins play a role in the aging process of human cells, so identifying sirtuin inhibitors becomes important,"​ said Martyn Smith, professor of toxicology at UC Berkeley's School of Public Health and principal investigator of the study.

DHC is used as a common fragrance in cosmetics, lotions and soaps.

"It's still a long jump from test tube to person, but our findings may imply that humans are exposed to chemicals in the diet and environment that block an important enzyme involved in longevity,"​ said Smith.

Notably, there are five forms of sirtuins found in yeast, and seven forms of sirtuin in humans. "There is good reason to think that DHC would inhibit at least some of the functions of some of the other forms of sirtuins,"​ said Jasper Rine, professor of genetics at UC Berkeley's Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and co-author of the paper.

The UC Berkeley researchers collaborated with Dr. Eric Verdin, associate director and senior investigator at the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology, which is affiliated with UC San Francisco. Verdin, who is also a professor of medicine at UCSF, is an expert on mammalian sirtuin enzymes.

"It's important to note that the role of sirtuins in aging is conserved in distantly related organisms such as yeast, drosophila and the small roundworm, C. elegans,"​ said Verdin.

He adds that this effect is will probably be replicated in the aging process of humans and that it couls also affect other functions metabolims and cancer.

Sirtuin enzymes are histone deacetylases, which modify the structure of chromatins, complex substances made up of DNA and protein. Histone deacetylases keep chromatins packed and tightly coiled in such a way that enzymes cannot activate the DNA, keeping the gene from being expressed. This type of gene 'silencing' is considered epigenetic, which means that it effectively controls the expression of a gene without altering the actual DNA molecules.

"Epigenetic mechanisms are crucial for nearly all aspects of development and have been implicated in a variety of human diseases,"​ said Rine. "Hence, agents which disrupt epigenetic processes can have profound consequences."

Andrew Olaharski, UC Berkeley post-doctoral researcher in environmental health sciences and lead author of the paper, noted that toxicology testing routinely focuses on an agent's ability to cause DNA mutations, or cell death, but does not test for chemical-induced epigenetic changes. p>"Identical twins with the exact same DNA may grow up to have different diseases because of epigenetic changes,"​ said Olaharski. "The identification that a common additive to foods and cosmetics may interfere with these epigenetic processes is simply one more piece of evidence supporting the important role environmental agents may play in human health."

To screen for possible sirtuin inhibitors, the researchers used haploid strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast. The haploid yeast strains, like gametes or sex cells, contained only one set of chromosomes, and would not normally grow on the medium prepared in the lab.

However, if the haploid yeast strains were exposed to an agent that disrupted sirtuin activity, epigenetic silencing would be reversed, the strains would mate to become diploid cells, and the yeast would grow on the medium. Of the compounds tested thus far, DHC was the first environmental agent to have shown the ability to inhibit sirtuin enzymes.

The researchers further tested the role of DHC in apoptosis, a process that causes a cell to die. They exposed DHC to human white blood cells and found that increasing concentrations of the compound led to increases in cell toxicity, apoptosis, and the stability of p53, a tumor-suppressing protein associated with apoptosis.

"Our study raises some concern about the potential effects of DHC on humans,"​ said Olaharski. "However, I would not be alarmed at this point, since we currently do not have any evidence that exposure to DHC in the diet accelerates the human aging process."

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