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P&G launches prescription strength deodorant

By Simon Pitman , 07-Mar-2007

Procter & Gamble is expanding its Secret female deodorant brand with the launch of a new product that is said to be clinically proven to provide prescription strength protection against wetness.

The product has been developed using a patented triple-action technology that provides three layer protection to fight wetness, odor and provide skin soothing conditioners.



On top of its unique formulation, it has also been developed for application at night, when P&G says that the body is most receptive to forming a strong barrier against perspiration.



P&G has developed the new extra-strength deodorant on the back of statistics, claiming that 23 per cent of women currently classify themselves as 'heavy sweaters'.



This revelation is evidently a cause of significant embarrassment for a large number of the female population, who say they curtail activities that might encourage them to sweat as a result of the condition.



In response to this problem many women seek out prescription-strength deodorant and anti-perspirant solutions. However, the general manager of P&G's Anti-Perspirant and Deodorant division, Alex Kieth, says that prescription-strength solutions often contain harsh ingredients, which have been linked to to skin irritation and outbreaks.



Aluminum Chloride is one ingredient that has come in for a great deal of criticism for its use in extra-strength anti-perspirant and deodorant products, but links have been made to the inclusion of aluminum-based ingredients in deodorants and cancer.



Most recently a review paper on metalloestrogens published in an edition of The Journal of Applied Toxicology by Dr. Philippa Darbre, Ph.D, drew attention to various research that has historically pointed to the link between aluminum salts in deodorants and between breast cancer.



In the review Dr. Darbre reported that underarm deodorants may contribute to the risk of breast cancer because they contain aluminum salts with metal ions that mimic the effect of estrogen.



However, the new Secrets prescription strength deodroant has been formulated without harsh chemicals, such as aluminiums, known to cause skin irritations and more serious conditions.



"At Secret, we strive to provide women with products that enable them to feel comfortable in their own skin and simply be themselves without worrying if their underarm protection is working," said Keith.



The New Secret Clinical Strength Anti-Perspirant/Deodorant will be launched in the US in March, in an Advanced Solid Scents: Light and Fresh and Powder Protection.



Recently sales of gender-specific deodorants, such as the Secrets brand, have been the driving force in a segment that has been largely stagnant for some years.



Unilever has commented that rising sales of its Axe deodorant range have been one of the key driving forces in its latest results, driven by a sex-laced marketing campaign aimed specifically at younger males.



Statistics from Packaged Facts' latest market report entitled Antiperspirants and Deodorants in the US, show that in 2005 sales grew 2.3 per cent to reach $1.9bn, giving reason to believe that sales will top the all-important $2bn mark by 2010.



The biggest difference to the market has been the growth in sales of deodorants aimed at teenage boys and men. Evidently those sex-laced Axe ads helped to push sales up by 67 per cent between 2004 and 2005.

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